Barrie Rugby COVID-19

Return to Play

Resources for Returning to Play During COVID-19

Return to play - covid-19

INFORMATION FOR PLAYER RETURN TO PLAY

UNDERSTANDING YOU AND YOUR HOUSEHOLD'S RISK

Returning to in-person rugby activities is optional. Each participant is responsible for determining if attending any in-person rugby activity is safe for you and your household. Individuals should also consider the risk to their workplace, especially if they are a health care worker or an essential worker. Factors may change over time and they should be regularly re-assessing thier risk and the risk to their entire household and workplace.

When making that decision, consider the following aspects of COVID-19:

· Research indicates that children and adolescents are just as likely to become infected as any other age group and can spread the disease. (WHO)

· COVID-19 causes a respiratory (lungs) type infection that is mild in most of the population (approximately 80%) but can be more severe in those who are older adults or those with chronic underlying conditions.

· The known underlying health conditions that put one at greater risk for COVID-19 include diabetes, hypertension, asthma, chronic lung disease, severe heart conditions, chronic kidney disease, obesity or a weakened immune system.

· Individuals with disabilities interacting with multiple care providers/supports and friends have an increased risk of contracting COVID-19 due to increased exposure.

hOW TO PREPARE IN ADVANCE OF rETURN TO ACTIVITY

1. Education

It is highly recommended that all youth and adult players complete relevant World Rugby COVID-19 Return to Play Awareness Courses: https://playerwelfare.worldrugby.org/covid-19-courses

Other World Rugby online courses that are strongly recommended for age-grade and adult players are: · Beginners Guide to Rugby · Laws of the Game · Rugby Ready · Concussion Management for the General Public

2. Goal Setting

This is the perfect time to re-establish your goals. Even with no competition on the horizon, reflecting, remembering, and recommitting to your “why” or reason for training and competing in your sport, can help you to remain positive and motivated while adapting to current restrictions.

While the sporting calendar continues to be impacted and many major rugby events will remain uncertain, athletes at all levels are encouraged to focus on setting some internal goals – goals that are just about you and not jeopardised by things out of your control.

3. Rules of Engagement for Players

The following are mandatory steps that all players will need to complete to attend in-person rugby activities while this plan is in effect.

4. Attestation of all Participants

You must complete a COVID-19 attestation prior to every in-person rugby activity, training and matches, you plan on attending. If you are a minor, your legal parent or guardian must complete this on your behalf.

5. Safely Arrive, Ready to Go

Travel to and from rugby activities via the safest option available to you.

Attend rugby activities already dressed in the appropriate kit. No access to changerooms will be permitted, other than to use the washroom facilities.

6. Be Self-Sufficient

Players are required to fill their personal water bottles at home. No sharing of water bottles will be permitted at rugby activities, so bring enough water to sustain your activities and travel to and from home.

7. Be Considerate, Be Honest

To keep everyone safe, follow all Federal and Provincial health orders and to be honest and upfront about having any symptoms of COVID-19. Now is not the time for ‘pushing through’ any feelings of unwellness.

8. Time to Training – Gradual Progression into Activity

Detraining/deconditioning will occur after even short periods of inactivity, or reduced activity relative to previous participation. Increasing training intensity and/or volume too quickly can increase risk of injuries. Long periods of inactivity (or reduced activity relative to previous levels) can result in large decrements in strength, power and aerobic fitness. Physical training should be considered prior to the resumption of high intensity rugby activities to rebuild the foundational base of strength and power that may have been lost following reduced training volume/activity.

In an effort to mitigate this increased risk of injury, it is important to gradually incorporate general physical strengthening and aerobic/anaerobic conditioning to help build foundational levels of fitness prior to returning to high intensity activities (jumping/landing, stop/start, and change of direction). A variety of guidelines exist to aid in safe progressions of the duration (or repetitions) and intensity of each component of a physical activity or training program [Example: IOC consensus statement on load in sport and risk of injury – Part 1, 2016; CSCCa and NSCA Guidelines].

Return to training should be a gradual process that will take place over a period of several weeks (and months). This is an important step in physically preparing athletes for the rigours of rugby and reducing their risk of injury. This does not mean that all injuries will be prevented, but a comprehensive training program can effectively prepare the body for high intensity activity when progressively and appropriately implemented.

Return to play - covid-19

INFORMATION FOR COACHES, OFFICIALS, TEAM MANAGERS & THERAPISTS: HOW TO SUPPORT PLAYERS RETURN TO PLAY

UNDERSTANDING YOU AND YOUR HOUSEHOLD'S RISK

Returning to in-person rugby activities is optional. Each coach, official, team manager or therapist is responsible for determining if attending any in-person rugby activity is safe for you and your household. You should also consider the risk to your workplace, especially if you are a health care worker or an essential worker. Factors may change over time and you should be regularly re-assessing your risk and the risk to your entire household and workplace.

When making that decision, consider the following aspects of COVID-19:

• Research indicates that children and adolescents are just as likely to become infected as any other age group and can spread the disease. (Source: WHO)

• COVID-19 causes a respiratory (lungs) type infection that is mild in most of the population (approximately 80%) but can be more severe in those who are older adults or those with chronic

• The known underlying health conditions that put one at greater risk for COVID-19 include diabetes, hypertension, asthma, chronic lung disease, severe heart conditions, chronic kidney disease, obesity, or a weakened immune system.

• Individuals with disabilities interacting with multiple care providers/supports and friends have an increased risk of contracting COVID-19 due to increased exposure.

hOW TO PREPARE IN ADVANCE OF rETURN TO ACTIVITY

I. Education

It is highly recommended that all coaches, officials, team managers and therapists complete relevant World Rugby COVID-19 Courses: https://playerwelfare.worldrugby.org/covid-19courses.

Coaches and officials must ensure that they adhere to Rugby Canada’s PlaySmart Guidelines, which include World Rugby Rugby Ready, World Rugby Concussion Management for the General Public and Laws of the Game where applicable, as well as maintaining a current background screening check.

ii. Managing Expectations

There are many benefits to participating in sport, both physically and emotionally. The coach has a role in building the whole person by ensuring that playing our game is an enjoyable experience in the player’s life journey. We should all understand the impact which this pandemic has had on everyone, and that our return will be gradual, and we should adopt a long-term development approach. What was a player’s desire and objective prior to the pandemic may have changed, and a greater importance should be placed on being physically active, social interaction and a player’s emotional wellbeing?

iii. Get Organized

The coaching process, plan – do – review, is a critical tool in getting organized and creating a safe and enjoyable environment for all, both physically and emotionally. Coaches should continue to take time to plan out their sessions, taking into account the restrictions that may be in place. Coaches will need to be creative to ensure that the sessions outcome may be achieved in different ways. The reflection can be as important as the planning and taking the time to reflect upon what went well and what can be improved upon next time, will help build foundations for the players to continue to want to return and stay involved.

iv. Plan Your Communications

As coaches we will be challenged in how we communicate with our players, and how players communicate with one another. Coaches should encourage players to self-organize when possible and keep activity levels high. Reduce the need for team huddles, and perhaps use other forms of communication to support your verbal communication, such as pre-prepared activity cards which the players can look at. Often coaches will motivate their players with positive interactions such as high fives and fist pumps, and these interactions should be minimized until social restrictions are removed.

RESPONSIBILITY OF CARE

Returning to group training environment is going to be a vastly different experience for everyone as restrictions necessitated by the Covid-19 pandemic start to be lifted. In addition to changes in ‘how’ teams are able to train, and the mitigation efforts required to train (i.e. masks, physical distancing), there will be a psychological component that accompanies the extent of changes, and the accumulated effects of the previous isolation period.

Coping with the uncertainty around COVID-19 has been challenging for everyone, but young people may be having an even tougher time during the pandemic. Social isolation, school closures, and uncertainty about what all this means for their friends and family are just a few of the concerns young children and teens may have at this time.

As shared by Canada’s Sport Medicine Advisory Committee (May 20, 2020) and adapted from psychology expert Dr. Bill Howatt, coaches can anticipate 3 individual types of reactions:

1. Come back to training with no issues – let’s get back at it!

a. These individuals have not been significantly impacted and are ready to start training.

b. Need to manage these individuals’ expectations regarding the “new normal” and be clear on risk mitigation procedures to which they must adhere.

2. Fearful and anxious of contamination or second wave

a. These individuals have high levels of fear and anxiety of exposure to virus and may not be comfortable with returning to group training yet feeling the pressure to do so.

b. Need to explore individual comfort levels and respond without judgement, creating a psychologically safe environment for all to train and choice for all involved.

3. Personally, impacted by COVID-19 or experienced secondary trauma

a. • These individuals are significantly impacted financially, psychologically, and/or emotionally as a result of COVID-19 related losses (e.g., loss of loved ones, job loss)

b. • Need to be sensitive to personal circumstances and have options for necessary supports with potential gradual reintegration.

The following list of resources can be referred to and shared with players or their parents/guardians to support players’ mental health wellness:

· Anxiety Canada, numerous free resources including Talking to Kids About COVID-19: https://www.anxietycanada.com/articles/talking-to-kids-about-covid-19/

· Canadian Mental Health Association, numerous free resources and Provincial directories: https://cmha.ca/

· Here2Talk, 24/7 new mental-health counselling and referral service for post-secondary students: https://here2talk.ca/

· Hope for Wellness Helpline, offers immediate mental health counselling and crisis intervention to all Indigenous peoples across Canada: https://www.hopeforwellness.ca/

· Kids Helpline, Available 24 hours a day to Canadians aged 5 to 29 who want confidential and anonymous care from professional counsellors: https://kidshelpphone.ca/get-info/were-here-for-you-during-covid-19-novel-coronavirus/

· Wellness Together Canada, offers the following at no cost to Canadians (1) Wellness self-assessment and tracking; (2) self guided courses, apps and other resources; (3) Group coaching and community of support; and (4) Counselling by text or phone: https://ca.portal.gs/

Return to play - covid-19

PLAYER ATTESTATION

(INDIVIDUAL) PLAYER ATTESTATION

· This Guide Contains the Following:

· How to confirm attendance to a session

· How to complete the daily attestation form

· To be completed before each session

LINK TO PARTICIPANT ATTENDANCE & ATTESTATION HOW TO DOCUMENT: https://sportlomo-userupload.s3.amazonaws.com/uploaded/galleries/13555_uploaded/cb4115400b6606fccfb9ce9f24191c84144546a4.pdf

Return to play - covid-19

PROPER HAND HYGEINE

PROPER HYGIENE CAN HELP REDUCE THE RISK OF INFECTION OR SPREADING INFECTION TO OTHERS

 

 

 

• wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially after

using the washroom and when preparing food

o use Health Canada authorized alcohol-based hand sanitizer if soap and water are not available

• when coughing or sneezing:

o cough or sneeze into a tissue or the bend of your arm, not your hand

o dispose of any tissues you have used as soon as possible in a lined waste basket and wash your hands afterwards

avoid touching your eyes, nose, or mouth with unwashed hands

[Source: https://www.canada.ca/en/public-health/services/diseases/2019-novel-coronavirus-infection/prevention-risks.html?topic=tilelink] ]

Still Have Questions?

Talk to our Risk and Safety Manager